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Thursday 18 November PLENARY SESSION
Welcome and Introduction

Eberhard Schatz, Correlation and Viktor Mravčik, National Focal Point, Office of the Government of the Czech Republic - Welcome Introduction to the situation regarding drug use, responses, harm reduction and peer work in the Czech Republic

Presentation
Tomáš Luczewský, Sananim, Czech Republic

- Overview of peer work within Sananim in Czech Republic

Presentation
Correlation representatives, Anniken Sand, City of Oslo Alcohol and Drug
Addiction Service, Norway and John-Peter Kools, Trimbos Institute,
The Netherlands - Introduction and background of the seminar
Presentation

- “Can Street Work perspectives help us all be more inclusive and effective in our practice?”

Presentation

- ”Recent experiences in Peer Work in the drug field. An illustration from HOPS, Macedonia.” Introduction on benefits and limitations of peer work and user involvement

Round table discussion
Facilitated by Cas Barendregt, IVO, The Netherlands
  • Berne Stålenkrantz: The Swedish Drug User Union, Sweden
  • Andrea Dixon, DISC, United Kingdom
  • Tomáš Luczewský, Sananim, Czech Republic
  • Pye Jakobsson, Rose Alliance, Sweden
  • Sérgio Rodrigues CASO, Portugal,
  • Theo van Dam, LSD, The Netherlands
Round table discussion on the successes, limitations and opportunities for peer work.
Key questions will be:

- What has been an exemplary success in your work?
- What can participants learn from you?
- What would you like to learn at this seminar?

 

Friday 19 November WORKSHOP SESSIONS
WS 1

Core elements in successful outreach work “What works, what doesn’t”
Facilitator: Ernst Buning, Quest for Quality, The Netherlands

  • Dennis Andrzejewski, Fixpunkt, Germany
  • Graeme Tiffany, Federation for Detached Youth Work, United Kingdom
  • Sacha Kaufman, Camden Detached Youth Service, UK
  • Børge Erdal, City of Oslo Outreach Service, Norway
  • Jarka Janickova, Proxima Sociale o.s. Czech Republic
  • Malin Andersson, Maria Ung, Sweden
Panel of experts. They will prepare what they consider to be some of the key-elements for successful outreach work. They will then include the audience in a discussion.
WS 2

Peer work with young people, Facilitator: Monica H. Island, Norway

Peer work and involving your users. How to start up, plan, log, and evaluate your work. Practice examples and interaction.
WS 3

Meaningful collaborations between services and clients/communities, Facilitator: José Queiroz, APDES, Portugal

”How can services and communities develop meaningful co-operations?” We will look at pros and cons of peer worker involvement in services and how to deal with constraints. We will also focus on the involvement of users in client councils and quality of service delivery and user-friendly services.
WS 4

Learning from other communities, Facilitator: Pye Jakobsson, Rose Alliance, Sweden

Learning from other communities. ”What can I learn from them.’’
This session will focus on peer work in different communities and exchange lessons learned that can be applied in other settings/communities (including working with sex workers, drug users, youth, migrants and Roma communities).

Parallel workshops WS 5

The Reflective Street worker: “How can we improve our work with simple tools and techniques?”,  Facilitator: Ragnhild Audestad, Norway

Our aim is to access the hidden knowledge in our everyday practice. We will demonstrate the use of reflecting teams. The workshop will be interactive, and
deal with a presented case from a Czech organisation.
WS 6

‘Get organised’, Starting up effective peer involvement
Facilitator: Jakob Huber, Contact Netz, Switzerlan

Skill building session on starting peer work. Presentations and discussion on recruitment, training, remuneration and supervision. ”How to start an effective
peer support activity?” This session is especially interesting for those who want
to (re)start a peer work.
WS 7

‘Know your scene’, From participative research to using
street knowledge’
,  Facilitated by: Richard Braam, CVO, the Netherland

Presentations and discussions on effective cooperations between communities, drug services and research. ”How can collaboration between research and
practice improve?” This session is especially interesting for services who
want to improve their impact and quality of their work
WS 8

Peer Work in the Czech republic,  Facilitated by: Pavel Nepustil, Czech Republic

  • Vlastimil Nečas
  • Aleš Herzog
  • Hanna Malinova
  • Jiri Richter
Session on experiences and current developments in the Czech Republic regarding Peer Work Language: Czech

 

Friday 19 November POLICY DIALOGUE SESSION
The Policy Dialogue Session helps to understand the political impact of Harm Reduction and Peer Support on national and European level. The meeting includes presentations with a European perspective, as well as presentations with a particular national focus. Participants will learn more about the situation and the challenges in the Czech Republic and compare it with the European experience. The meeting is interactive and will provide sufficient opportunities for discussion and exchange.
Policy Dialogue Meeting
  • Opening - Katrin Schiffer
Policy Dialogue Meeting
  • Welcome - Nina Janyskova, City Hall Prague
Policy Dialogue Meeting
Policy Dialogue Meeting
Policy Dialogue Meeting
  • Peer involvement as essential element of a human rights based harm reduction approach - Eliot Albert, INPUD, united Kingdom
Policy Dialogue Meeting
Policy Dialogue Meeting
Policy Dialogue Meeting

Panel discussion with various stakeholders

Facilitator: Katrin Schiffer, Correlation with policy makers, service providers, police, researchers, drug user representatives, European experts

Policy Dialogue Meeting
  • Conclusions - Eberhard Schatz, Correlation
Parallel workshop WS 9
The workshop will be facilitated by the use of Open Space Methodology and will also serve as an introduction to this process oriented methodology. The workshop requires active participation. (Max 25 participants)

 

Saturday 20 November WORKSHOP SESSION
Parallel Workshops WS 10

‘Strengthen your case’. Facilitated by John-Peter Kools, Trimbos institute, the
Netherlands

“How to improve debating and advocacy skills in order to convince policy makers, politicians and media of the value of your work?” Skill building session argumentation for service providers and peers.
WS 11

Motivational Interviewing and exploring ambivalence. Facilitator: Bohumila
Chochosolouva, Czech Republic/Norway

“Why this method is user involving, empowering and suited for early intervention and a younger target group.” Working for change. Practical examples on communication and exchange of experience.
WS 12

Evidence based interventions – is peer work effective? Facilitator: Marco Di Giorgi, L`ago nel paglio/Kango

“How do we know if what we do is effective? Is only what is possible to measure good work?” A Dutch peer support project was evaluated by the University of Nijmegen The session will also provide tools that enable organisations to
monitor their activities.

 

Saturday 20 November PLENARY SESSION
Presentation
Closing

Correlation representatives Anniken Sand, John-Peter Kools,

Closing

Correlation projects

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